Best Nightclubs in Las Vegas

The Best Nightclubs in Las Vegas

After spending all day at the wildest pool parties on the Strip, you may want to chill out, recover, and relax with a good book in the silence of your hotel room. Or you can double down and spend all night at one of the hottest nightclubs in Las Vegas. Each one is a prime destination for being seen, hooking up, and paying way too much for a Jack and Coke. But you’re not here to drink. You’re here to dance, pump your first, and hear music from the world’s most loved (and highest paid) DJs. Think of it as high-intensity training for the next edition of EDC. So, get familiar with the best nightclubs in Vegas — and then make friends with someone who can get you on the VIP list.

Omnia

Dance the night away under a crazy high-tech chandelier

When it comes to nightclubs, you can’t go wrong with Omnia. After opening in 2015, it still has that “like-new” club feel with a rooftop terrace that shows off killer views of the Strip from Caesars Palace. The star power is huge. Calvin Harris plays semi-regular Friday night sets and Tiesto stops by when he isn’t busy at sister club Hakkasan. Other headliners include Zedd, Martin Garrix, and Steve Aoki. Technology is almost as big an attraction as the DJs. The main room — modeled after the Metropolitan Opera — is famous for its massive 22,000-pound chandelier that hovers above the dance floor and moves to the music. It was designed with your Instagram feed in mind. The smaller club-within-a-club Heart of Omnia is the space formerly occupied by Pure. Sundays usually feature Latin music on the terrace. When celebrating a bachelorette party or bachelor party, this club will allow Las Vegas strippers to come out to join your party.

Kaos

Indulgent party spot makes full use of its outdoor pool deck

When Station Casinos renovated the Palms, the company went all-in with Kaos — a nightclub and day club that blends almost seamlessly from its indoor dance floor to an expansive pool deck. At the center — a 65-foot-tall bronze statue of a naked headless figure. (And yes, he’s the only one allowed to go nude by the pool.) Palms invested heavily in its headliners, which include Cardi B, Marshmello, and G-Eazy. Here’s a tip — if you want to skip the cover charge and long security lines during the day, book a brunch reservation at Greene St. Kitchen. The patio overlooks the club and guests have direct access to party after their meal.

Hakkasan

The three-level club has its own restaurant, valet, and groundbreaking light show

Hakkasan has been around since 2013 but is keeping things fresh with a new grid over the main room billed as the world’s largest kinetic light art installation. It’s a spectacle of changing lights, colors, and imagery that only enhances sets by EDM headliners like Tiesto and Zedd. Head downstairs, where the smaller Ling Ling Club hosts open-format DJs and the Ling Ling Lounge (keep ’em straight) has its share of chill and hip-hop. Pre-game next door at Hakkasan Restaurant — a Cantonese fine-dining spot with direct access to the club — and take advantage of the free Hakkasan valet for those with dinner or VIP table reservations. It’s worth it to avoid the long walk from the MGM Grand parking garage.

Jewel

Modern club with high-tech effects and themed VIP rooms

Jewel is a little smaller than some of the other clubs in Vegas, but that only adds to the energy and atmosphere at this ultra-modern party spot. Between the hip-hop of Tyga and the EDM of Steve Aoki, Jewel makes a point to have an eclectic lineup of resident headliners. The wow-factor is felt in the illuminated staircase by the entrance and the LED video effects near the stage. Five large VIP rooms overlook the main floor — each with its own theme. For example, the G.O.A.T. pays tribute to American sports while the Blind Tiger is modeled after a vintage speakeasy. Flawless Mondays is a busy industry and locals’ night.

Marquee

Three distinctive rooms and a pool deck

A marquee allows you to choose your own experience. Party hard in the main room, where an elevated DJ booth gives clear views of the button-pushing and fist-pumping as it happens or hang by the pool where you can soak in the lights of Las Vegas. The Boom Box, on the other hand, is more of a cocktail lounge — but don’t worry, you can still invest in bottle service — with windows that overlook the Strip. The Library has bookshelves with a pool table and fireplace. The DJ lineup isn’t as heavy on star power as some other Vegas clubs, but Marquee more than made up for it by locking down a Travis Scott residency. When the sun is out, Marquee Dayclub is one of the busiest (and most tightly packed) pool parties on the Strip.

XS

DJ booth rotates between indoor and outdoor spaces

XS has been around for 10 years now — a lifetime in Vegas — but instead of trying to rebrand itself or tweak its identity, the venue remains fresh and timeless with frequent design updates. Of course, it doesn’t hurt to have big-name residencies by the likes of Drake, the Chainsmokers, and David Guetta either. A rotating DJ booth separates the main dance floor and an outdoor pool deck that hosts Nightswim parties on Sunday nights. The place is all about indulgence with real gold decor and 10,000 individual light fixtures to keep the mood in check. You’ve also got 170 VIP tables and cabanas for maxing out your credit card on bottle service.

On the Record

A playful, retro vibe for nightclubbers who don’t always like nightclubs

While the nightclub scene has its share of redundancy, On the Record does its best to put a fresh spin on the concept. It’s really more of a glorified lounge, decorated in vintage concert posters, a DJ booth that resembles a Rolls Royce, and a fireplace in the center of an area known as the Living Room. The outdoor patio has a British double-decker bus serving drinks and if that’s not enough to keep your attention, head to one of three karaoke rooms — each one dedicated to a different decade — and belt out your own entertainment. There’s also a secretive speakeasy-style bar where the focus is on cocktails. Overall, the playlist skews retro with a fair share of the ’80s and ’90s hits you might actually recognize.

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